Tag Archives: chinook

Pike Brewing XXXXX Stout

All those x’s should give me some really oddball hits on this blog, LOL!

But we’re talking about Pike Brewery’s XXXXX Extra stout, a very delicious beer that’s in my glass right now!  Sorry to disappoint if your search engine was searching for something else!

This is about the third or fourth of Pike’s brews that I’ve tried.  I keep trying them because they are good beers.  I really like this one, it’s (perhaps) the best of the Pike beers I’ve tried so far.  Albeit that’s not a lot of beers, but I just discovered them, and plan to try more of their beers soon!

Pike XXXXX Extra Stout

Black as night with a good tannish-brown head and good lacing.

Aroma is roasty and a little burnt with nice coffee and chocolate notes.

Flavor follows through with the nose, maybe with a touche of anise (but it’s subtle).  The chocolate and coffee are a bit more pronounced, leaving a slightly cappuccino effect for the imbiber.

Body is full, thick, rich, and leaves a wonderful slightly roasted, slightly burnt aftertaste that I really enjoy in a stout.

Definitely recommended.  I’ll for sure buy this one again.  It wasn’t even very expensive, so it’s a great value (I can’t remember the exact price, but it was very reasonable).  A very nice stout you should definitely try if you’re a stout lover.

Pike XXXXX Extra Stout

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Hop Stoopid NHC Challenge

Hop Stoopid Clone Challenge – NHC

I was just having a hop stoopid, one of my fav DIPAs.  We kinda drank most of the homebrew, and we’re waiting for more to be ready, so I’m having some commercial brews.  I’ve already reviewed hop stoopid here, but it’s always worthy of discussing it again.

I’ve always loved this beer from the very first time I tried it.  It’s very clean in its bitterness and is near perfection for a DIPA if you ask me.   It’s also a major bargain, well worth the price!  DIPA lovers, if you haven’t tried this one, TRY IT!

The above link is wonderful.  They give you tons of info on how they make hop stoopid.  Plus, they are asking you to bring your home brewed versions for them to taste and discuss!  I’d love to go to their suite at the NHC and submit my version to their head brewer!

The link also has recipes for both all grain and extract.  DAMN COOL of Lagunitas to do this!

I want to try a version of this for my first IIPA.  I need to come up with some simcoe hops first, but rest assured, this one will be brewed by me sooner or later!

Cheers to Lagunitas!

 

Avery India Pale Ale

Having a nice brew right now, Avery IPA.

It’s a pretty tasty IPA.

Tan and quite clear with a very nice white foamy head and great lacing.

Aroma is a little subdued but is nicely hoppy and piney,  with notes of citrus and maybe some apple juice.

Taste is piney, with lemons and grapefruits, a little sweet fruitiness, and some nice hoppiness.

Body is medium, carbonated nicely, and easy to drink.  Mellow and not too over the top, it’s a clean tasting, somewhat mild IPA.

Overall it’s a nice beer.  I’ve got five left from my sixer and I think I’ll enjoy them all as much as I’m enjoying this one!

Cheers Avery Brewing!

Breckenridge Small Batch 471 IPA

One of my favorites from Breckenridge Brewery, 471 IPA is a nice IIPA/Imperial double.  Coming in at 9.2%, it’s got some kick too!

Light orange in color and almost clear. Head was pretty good at one finger, and lasted. Lacing was good. It’s certainly a pretty color, and not the typically color you’d expect from a DIPA.

Hops and citrus dominate the nose, along with a touch of pine.

Tastes bold and fresh, very darn tasty. Piney hops is the predominate flavor, but citrus (grapefruits, lemon peel) and a light fruitiness come through as well. It’s kind of sweet and has a nice light malty background too. A light spiciness finishes things off.

Feel is quite light and refreshing for a double IPA, yet the body is still medium and amply carbonated. The finish is semi-dry and slightly oily with fruity hops.

I like various Colorado breweries, and this beer racks up another winner for Colorado!   It’s a pretty good price for a four pack too.

Pike IPA

Pike IPA is next on my blogging/reviewing list.  It’s pretty darn tasty stuff!

Coppery and clear, light tan head wasn’t bad and lacing was good.

Aroma is subdued but nice, earthy hops, piney resin, light malts.

Taste is pretty balanced, if a bit heavy on the earthy hops side.  Malts are ample and create a nice balanced beer.  I think the munich malt adds a nice dimension, it’s not something I see a lot in IPAs.

Body is medium and actually pretty drinkable, despite the rather heavy malt and hops assault on your tastebuds.

Overall this beer makes me want to try more of Pike’s beers.  That should say it all right there.

Juniper Pale Ale II Project

Well my original Juniper Pale Ale was a big success, so I’ve decided to brew it again, this time all-grain.  Gee, this is starting to sound familiar!  This time however, I’m not only revisiting an old recipe, I’m co-brewing it with another brewer, MrOH as he is known on beeradvocate.com.  You can read the entire thread here.

Here is the most important part of the original post:

My original Juniper Pale Ale was an extract/partial mash ale. MrOH got his hands on some, and apparently he liked it enough to want to try a version of it himself! Admittedly, it was pretty good, one of my better extract beers. I liked it, other people liked it, and I thought it was worthy of trying again, this time all-grain.

The premise of our project is that we’re both going to brew the same basic spiced beer / APA using these parameters…

9 lbs base malt, any combination
1 lb crystal malt, any combination
1 oz juniper berries

Essentially, that’s the beer (5 gallons). The addition of juniper isn’t specified exactly as to how, but from our conversations we both intended to crush the berries and add late in the boil.

Hops wise we hadn’t come up with an exact criteria, but MrOH suggested:

1.5 oz hops @ 10
2.5 oz hops @ FO
1 oz DH
bittering addition to bring it up to 40 IBUs (max)

I will probably change the hops parameters a little, but essentially it won’t make much difference.

We are looking for a beer that’s a good APA/spiced beer, has a light to moderate juniper taste (I don’t want “gin beer”), is neither too bitter nor dominated by hops (i.e. let the juniper have a little sunlight), and is refreshing and tasty. Mostly the last one though, tasty is what matters. But I guess there’s no point in making a “juniper” beer if you don’t show off the juniper a little.

My actual recipe’s  grain bill:

  • 7 lbs pale ale malt
  • 2 lbs maris otter
  • 12 oz caramel malt 20L
  • 4 oz caramel malt 60L
  • 2 oz carafoam

Hops wise, I bounced around a lot, but finally decided on the following schedule:

  • 14 g columbus 60 minutes
  • 35g chinook 10 minutes
  • 14g willamette at 10 minutes
  • 21 g Northern brewer flameout
  • 14g  columbus flameout

Yeast: US-05

Targets:

  • IBUs 39.5
  • OG 1.053
  • FG 1.012
  • SRM 6.6
  • ABV 5.4%

Procedure:

  1. prepare checklist
  2. lay out ingredients and equipment
  3. reconstitute dry yeast using 95F boiled spring water and allow to cool to room temperature
  4. Add grains to mash tun
  5. bring 3 gallon spring water to 166 F
  6. Add 3.5 gallons of 166F spring water to mash tun on top of grains, then stir well
  7. add more water to boil pot, bring to near 172F and hold for sparging
  8. measure temperature after temperature equalizes in mash.  Once again, this has been pretty spot-on the last few batches, so I don’t anticipate having to boil extra water, but I will be ready just in case
  9. adjust mash temperature using either heated mash water or cool spring water as needed to reach 152F, if necessary
  10. mash for 75 minutes at 151F
  11. during mash, stir about every 15 minutes or so, checking temperature and adjusting if needed
  12. at end of mash, begin draining wort into pitcher
  13. allow first runnings to drain into a pitcher until clear
  14. pour first runnings back on top of mash
  15. drain remaining wort into boil pot until mash tun is near empty
  16. add 2.4 gallons 172F water (adjusted as needed)
  17. stir well
  18. drain first runnings of first batch sparge into pitcher until clear (or close to it)
  19. pour first runnings of first batch sparge back on top of mash
  20. drain wort into main boil pot until near empty
  21. add another 2.4 gallons 172F water to mash tun (adjusted as needed)
  22. stir well
  23. drain first runnings of second batch sparge to pitcher until clear (or close to it)
  24. add first runnings back into mash tun
  25. drain wort into main boil pot
  26. add wort chiller to boil pot, filled with hot water
  27. bring main boil pot to a boil
  28. when boil is reached, boil 60 minutes total
  29. at 60 minutes, add 14g Columbus Hops
  30. at 25 minutes, add about 1/4 tsp Wyeast nutrient blend to a small amount of spring water and dissolve
  31. add nutrient blend at 20 minute mark
  32. add 1/8 tsp Irish moss powder at 20 minute mark
  33. add 1.25 oz chinook at 10 minutes
  34. add 0.5 oz willamette at 10 minutes
  35. add .75 oz chinook at flameout
  36. add 0.5 oz columbus at flameout
  37. at flameout, turn on water for wort chiller and chill to 170 F
  38. let stand about 15 minutes hop rest, then turn wort chiller back on
  39. begin sanitation procedures on spoon, thermometer, bucket, wine thief
  40. stir occasionally with sanitized stainless spoon during cooling
  41. ensure bucket, wine thief, thermometer, strainer, spoon are sanitized
  42. when wort gets to about 70F, add to fermentation bucket, pouring through sanitized strainer to catch any extra solids and to help aerate.  If necessary, clean strainer during process and re-sanitize to remove most of the hop trub before fermentation
  43. take OG reading with sanitized wine thief
  44. thoroughly aerate wort with sanitized stainless steel spoon again
  45. ensure wort is 68F or a little less before pitching yeast
  46. ensure yeast is a little cooler than wort before pitching
  47. pitch yeast
  48. gently stir using sanitized stainless steel spoon
  49. install sanitized bucket lid and airlock
  50. ferment in freezer chest w/Johnson controller for 14+ days at 66F
  51. after 14+ days, add dry hops, 1 oz chinook, 0.5 oz willamette
  52. ferment a total of 21+ days
  53. take FG sample and bottle
  54. use 5 oz corn sugar at bottling

Actual OG:1.052

Actual FG: 1.010

Notes:

All Grain Batch 2 – English IPA with Chinook and Hallertau

It’s time for my second batch of all-grain beer.  This one will be an English IPA using chinook and hallertau hops.  Here’s the ingredient list:

  • 6 lbs 6-row pale malt
  • 12 oz cara-amber
  • 8 oz amber malt
  • 8 oz caramel wheat malt
  • 0.5 oz chinook 13.9%AA at 60 minutes
  • 1 oz hallertau 3.9%AA at 15 minutes
  • 1 oz hallertau 3.9%AA at 8 minutes
  • 1 oz hallertau 3.9%AA at 0 minutes
  • 2 oz hallertau 3.9%AA dry hop
  • Wyeast 1275 Thames Valley Ale Yeast

Procedure:

  1. prepare checklist
  2. lay out ingredients and equipment
  3. Add grains to mash tun
  4. bring 3 gallon spring water to 168 F
  5. Add 2 1/4 gallons of 168F spring water to mash tun on top of grains, then stir well
  6. continue to heat the remaining water to near boil
  7. measure temperature after temperature equalizes in mash
  8. adjust mash temperature using either heated mash water or cool spring water as needed to reach 155F
  9. mash for 1 hour minutes at 155F
  10. during mash, bring another 3 gallons of spring water to 172F
  11. during mash, stir about every 15 minutes or so, checking temperature and adjusting if needed
  12. at end of mash, begin draining wort into pitcher
  13. allow first runnings to drain into a pitcher until clear
  14. pour first runnings back on top of mash
  15. drain remaining wort into boil pot until mash tun is near empty
  16. add 1.5 gallons 172F water (adjusted as needed)
  17. stir well
  18. drain first runnings of first batch sparge into pitcher until clear (or close to it)
  19. pour first runnings of first batch sparge back on top of mash
  20. drain wort into main boil pot until near empty
  21. add another 1.5 gallons 172F water to mash tun (adjusted as needed)
  22. stir well
  23. drain first runnings of second batch sparge to pitcher until clear (or close to it)
  24. add first runnings back into mash tun
  25. drain wort into main boil pot
  26. add wort chiller to boil pot, filled with hot water
  27. bring main boil pot to a boil
  28. when boil is reached, add bittering hops, 0.5 oz chinook at 60 minutes
  29. at 30 minutes, add about 1/4 tsp Wyeast nutrient blend to a small amount of spring water and dissolve
  30. add nutrient blend at 15 minute mark
  31. add 1/8 tsp Irish moss powder at 15 minute mark
  32. add 1 oz hallertau at 15 minutes
  33. add 1 oz hallertau at 8 minutes
  34. add 1 oz hallertau at 0 minutes
  35. hop stand for 10 minutes
  36. at flameout, turn on water for wort chiller
  37. begin sanitation procedures on spoon, thermometer, bucket, wine thief
  38. stir occasionally with sanitized stainless spoon during cooling
  39. ensure bucket, wine thief, thermometer, strainer, spoon are sanitized
  40. when wort gets to about 72F, add to fermentation bucket, pouring through sanitized strainer to catch any extra solids and to help aerate
  41. take OG reading with sanitized wine thief
  42. thoroughly aerate wort with sanitized stainless steel spoon again
  43. ensure wort is 72F or a little less before pitching yeast
  44. ensure yeast is a little cooler than wort before pitching
  45. pitch yeast
  46. gently stir using sanitized stainless steel spoon
  47. install sanitized bucket lid and airlock
  48. ferment in closet for 14 days at 67F ambient air temp.
  49. after 14 days, add dry hops, 2 oz hallertau
  50. ferment a total of 21 days
  51. take FG sample and bottle
  52. use 3.5 oz corn sugar at bottling

Targets:

  • OG  1.056
  • FG 1.014
  • SRM 11.5
  • IBU 55.9
  • ABV 5.5%

Actual OG: 1.046 (a little low)

Actual FG: 1.012

Notes: only yielded 2.5 gallons of usable beer due to excessive trub (no doubt from spilling during the transfer from kettle to bucket).

Just Wingin’ It English CDA

Well this one is coming into being sort of completely by accident.  I had bought a supply of ingredients to last a couple months, mainly to save shipping.  During that time I was using DME out of one of the bags to make yeast starters.  Turns out I didn’t calculate correctly and I’ve actually been using DME from a recipe I originally intended to be an English style mild.

Yeah, I wasn’t that sure about that one in the first place, and now I’m definitely totally unsure.  Plus I’ve been experimenting with making a bit less wort in order to facilitate a complete (or near complete) boil.

Anyway, I used quite a bit of the DME I had intended for the original recipe making starters, and now I’ve got to improvise in order to use it up.  These rather strange circumstances have led me to…
Just Wingin’ It English CDA

Yeah I think there are multiple contradictions just in the title, which may be an oxymoron of sorts in and of itself.

What I’ve decided on is to make an English IPA of sorts.  However, the specialty grains (partial mash) I’ve chosen will make the SRM pretty dark.  So it’s sort of an English IPA mixed with a Black IPA, or Cascadian Dark Ale.  Or an English CDA.  Or something.  But that’s what I’m naming it, and this is what it will contain…

**NOTE: 4 gallon batch**

  • Briess Pilsen (Extra) Light Dry Extract  2 lbs, 8 oz
    Crisp Pale Ale  3 lbs, 8 oz
    Crisp Crystal Malt 77L  0 lbs, 8 oz
    Crisp Pale Chocolate Malt  0 lbs, 3 oz
    Crisp Black Malt  0 lbs, 2 oz
    Chinook Pellets  0.5 oz @ 60 mins
    Northern Brewer Pellets  1 oz @ 15 mins
    Chinook Pellets 0.5 oz @ 10 mins
    Northern Brewer Pellets  1 oz @ 5 mins
    Bramling Cross Pellets     1 oz @ 0 mins
    Northern Brewer Pellets  2 oz @ Dry
    Wyeast Labs London Ale III

Now I have made one English-ish IPA in the past, and it came out really good.  So this recipe is hereby morphed into something somewhat English-IPA like, but with some dark specialty malts.

This will be a partial mash brew.  I haven’t quite decided on the exact mash technique, but it will be stovetop and batch sparged.

UPDATE: I wound up doing a mini-mash in a pot on the stove.  I kept the temperature at 155F by carefully monitoring and adding a little heat when needed, keeping in mind thermal inertia and adding it VERY CAREFULLY.  I only had to add heat twice, and not very much.  I was able to keep it within about 3 degrees of my target temp for one hour.  Then I used a strainer to remove the grains, just poured it all into a big strainer basically.  Then I “sparged” with 170F water by carefully rinsing the grains a couple times.  Probably not optimal technique, but it worked, as the beer came out good!

Targets:

OG: 1.058     FG:  1.016     IBU: 59.2     SRM: 19.40     ABV: 5.50

Procedure:

  1. prepare checklist
  2. lay out ingredients and equipment
  3. bring 1.5 gallon spring water to 165 F
  4. add grains
  5. mash for 60 minutes at 155F
  6. Sparge and strain**
  7. In separate pot, pre-boil 2.5 gallons spring water
  8. when grains are finished mashing, combine wort into boiling pot with pre-heated spring water and bring to boil
  9. add bittering hops, 0.5 oz chinook at 60 minute mark
  10. add the wort chiller at 30 minutes.  make sure wort chiller is pre-filled with hot water
  11. add the DME incrementally during the last 30 minutes of the boil
  12. add 1 oz northern brewer at 15 minute mark
  13. add 1/4 tsp Irish moss powder at 15 minute mark
  14. begin sanitation procedures on spoon, thermometer, bucket, wine thief
  15. add 0.5 oz chinook at 10 minute mark
  16. add 1 oz northern brewer at 5 minute mark
  17. add 1 oz bramling cross at FO
  18. hop rest 20 minutes
  19. begin cooling with wort chiller
  20. stir occasionally with sanitized stainless spoon during hop rest and during cooling
  21. ensure bucket, wine thief, thermometer, spoon are sanitized
  22. when wort gets to about 75F, add to fermentation bucket
  23. top to 4 gallons with chilled spring water (if necessary)
  24. take OG reading with sanitized wine thief
  25. thoroughly aerate wort with sanitized stainless steel spoon
  26. ensure wort is 75F or a little less before pitching yeast
  27. pitch yeast
  28. gently stir using sanitized stainless steel spoon
  29. install sanitized bucket lid and airlock
  30. ferment in closet for 7-9 days at 67F ambient air temp.
  31. after 7-9 days, add 2 oz northern brewer for dry hopping
  32. take FG sample and bottle (after a minimum of 14 days)
  33. use 4 oz corn sugar at bottling

Actual OG: 1.052

FG: 1.012

Notes:

May 5th, Big Brew Day! Al’s Cascade APA

May 5th, a perfect day to brew my 5th batch of delicious homebrew!

Well with May 5th being big brew day, I’m going to brew an APA which showcases cascade hops.  Actually, this should be fairly similar to my previous beer, Al’s Red-Eye Ale, in that both have lots of cascade hops.  This partly reflects the fact that I bought an entire pound of cascade pellets!   I’ve got some different hops on order for the near future, but cascade has done me so well so far, I don’t think I’ll go wrong here!

EDIT: After drinking some of Al’s Red-Eye Ale, I’m going to cut the hops a little for this one.  I want a pale ale, and not another IPA.

I haven’t quite decided for sure on the bittering addition, but I will modify this post when I’ve made up my mind.  For the moment, I’m going to say I’m bittering with Chinook.

I’ve also read a number of posts where people use a little bit of wheat to help with head retention, so I’m going to try a few ounces of wheat in this one.  I haven’t had a problem with head retention yet, but hey, it’s always nice to have a great looking brew!  I suppose it can’t hurt to give it a try.

A new addition to my equipment is a nice scale that will allow me precise control of all ingredient amounts.

Regardless of the final recipe, I’m going to add a lot of hops, so this one might really be more of an IPA, but whatever, I’m calling it Al’s Cascade APA.

This recipe is pretty close (not exact though) to another pale ale I’m going to make soon using Juniper berries.  I won’t use as much hops in the Juniper Pale Ale though, as I don’t want to choke out the Juniper!

Another thing I have noticed is that the website I’m using for the targets doesn’t match software I downloaded when it comes to the numbers.  The downloaded software gives considerably higher bitterness values.  Since I can’t see how they’re doing the calculations in either case, I’m not exactly sure which one is right.  I tend to question free software, but at least it’s fun to play with!  However, this brew should be fine either way.

  • Briess Golden Light Liquid Extract  3 lbs, 4 oz
  • Briess Golden Light Dry Extract     3 lbs, 0 oz
  • Briess 2-Row Brewer’s Malt  1 lbs, 0 oz
  • Briess 2 Row Caramel 40  1 lbs, 0 oz
  • Briess Flaked Wheat  0 lbs, 4 oz
  • Chinook Pellets  0.75 oz @ 60 mins
  • Cascade Pellets  0.5 oz @ 15 mins
  • Cascade Pellets  0.5 oz @ 5 mins
  • Cascade Pellets  0.5 oz @ 0 mins
  • Cascade Pellets  1 oz @ Dry
  • SAFALE US-05 American Ale

Targets:

OG  1.054

FG  1.014

IBU  30

SRM  8.33

ABV  5.24

Volume: 5.5 gallons

Procedure:

  1. prepare checklist
  2. lay out ingredients and equipment
  3. bring 1.75-2 gallons spring water to 165 F
  4. add grains (in mesh bag)
  5. steep for 40 minutes at 155F
  6. In separate pot, pre-boil 1 gallon spring water
  7. when grains are finished steeping, remove grain bag, add 1 gallon boiling water and bring entire pot to a boil for one hour
  8. add bittering hops, 3/4 oz chinook at 60 minute mark
  9. over the course of the last 20 minutes of the boil, add the LME and DME
  10. at 20 minute mark, add wort chiller, pre-filled with hot water
  11. begin pre-boiling of 2 cups spring water for yeast rehydration
  12. add 0.5 oz cascade at 15 minute mark
  13. add 1/4 tsp Irish moss powder
  14. add 0.5 oz cascade at 5 minute mark
  15. add 0.5 oz cascade at flameout
  16. let stand 10 minutes before beginning cooling
  17. begin sanitation procedures on spoon, thermometer, bucket, siphon, hoses, wine thief
  18. stir occasionally with sanitized stainless spoon during hop rest and during cooling
  19. while wort is cooling, add 2 gallons chilled spring water to sanitized primary fermenting bucket, allowing it to fall into bucket to increase aeration
  20. add pre-boiled water to sanitized 2L flask for yeast rehydration
  21. when 2L flask reaches about 95F, pitch yeast into flask and place on stir plate for about 20 minutes
  22. when wort gets to about 75F, add to fermentation bucket using strainer
  23. top to 5.5 gallons with chilled spring water
  24. take OG reading with sanitized wine thief
  25. thoroughly aerate wort with sanitized stainless steel spoon
  26. ensure wort is 70F or a little less before pitching yeast
  27. pitch yeast
  28. gently stir using sanitized stainless steel spoon
  29. install sanitized bucket lid and airlock
  30. add bucket to large plastic container filled partially with H2O to keep fermentation from getting too warm.  add ice daily if needed to keep fermentation temperatures reasonable.
  31. ferment in closet for 7-9 days at 69F ambient air temp.
  32. after 7-9 days, add one ounce cascade hops for dry hopping
  33. take FG sample and bottle (after a minimum of 14 days)
  34. use 4 oz corn sugar at bottling

Actual OG:

Actual FG:

Notes:

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